Posts Under Health and Safety

Difficult-To-Diagnose Condition May Present As Treatment-Resistant Mouth Sores

In an article for the Philadelphia Inquirer (2/7), Dr. Eric T. Stoopler, an associate professor of oral medicine, discussed a 55-year-old man who sought help at an oral health clinic after suffering from mouth sores, skin lesions, and difficulty breathing. The man “died of respiratory failure about a year after he first noticed the mouth sores.” Before his death, “immunological blood tests suggested the patient’s mouth sores and skin lesions were actually symptoms of an condition called paraneoplastic pemphigus, usually caused by an underlying cancer,” and a biopsy revealed lymphoma. Dr. Stoopler said that “this patient’s case underscores the importance of regular dental exams and prompt evaluation of oral sores that don’t heal quickly on their own,” adding that “these lesions may be the first signs of a possibly life-threatening condition.”

        Visit MouthHealthy.org for additional information on mouth sores.

Xerostomia Can Contribute To A Variety Of Oral Health Problems

In an article in the Pharmacy Times (2/10), clinical pharmacy writer Yvette C. Terrie discussed xerostomia, stating that “if left untreated, xerostomia can cause discomfort and contribute to halitosis, dental caries, periodontal disease, and other oral health problems, such as candidiasis infection due to disturbance of the oral microflora resulting from decreased salivary flow.” Medications and medical conditions are among the variety of causes of xerostomia, Terrie noted, adding that “the goals of treating xerostomia include identifying the possible cause, relieving discomfort, and preventing complications such as dental caries and periodontal infections.”

Regular Dental Visits Advised At Intervals Determined By Dentist

In a broadcast on its website, the Today Show Online (2/8) spoke with health and wellness reporter Anna Medaris Miller about her recent article in the Huffington Post discussing common health habits, including how often people should visit the dentist. Miller stated that people should receive regular dental care at intervals determined by their dentist.

Millennials Encouraged To Receive Regular Dental Care

USA Today (2/7, Higdon) advised millennials to take care of their health now, stating, “Think of your body like a car, it’s an investment that requires routine check ups, maintenance and care.” In addition to seeing a primary care doctor on a regular basis, the article recommends “maintaining regular dental health with a dentist, visiting an eye doctor and having skin checked by a dermatologist will also make sure no other issues can creep up.”

Mouth Sores May Indicate Difficult-To-Diagnose Condition.

In an article for the Philadelphia Inquirer (2/7), Dr. Eric T. Stoopler, an associate professor of oral medicine, discusses a patient who suffered from treatment-resistant mouth sores and skin lesions and “died of respiratory failure about a year after he first noticed the mouth sores.” Before his death, “immunological blood tests suggested the patient’s mouth sores and skin lesions were actually symptoms of an condition called paraneoplastic pemphigus, usually caused by an underlying cancer,” and a biopsy revealed lymphoma. Dr. Stoopler said that “this patient’s case underscores the importance of regular dental exams and prompt evaluation of oral sores that don’t heal quickly on their own,” adding that “these lesions may be the first signs of a possibly life-threatening condition.” MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on mouth sores.

 
 
No Scientific Evidence Charcoal Teeth Whitening Method Works.

The Daily Beast (4/6, Yu) stated that some health and beauty products now contain activated charcoal, a substance traditionally used in air filters and by hospitals and poison control centers to treat “poisoning or a drug overdose.” With some bloggers and vloggers touting the benefits of using the powdery black substance to whiten teeth, the Daily Beast spoke with dental professionals, including American Dental Association spokesperson Dr. Kim Harms, to determine whether using activated charcoal is safe and effective. “There’s no evidence at all that activated charcoal does any good for your teeth,” Dr. Harms said, adding that it is unclear whether using activated charcoal is safe, and the concern with using abrasives to brush teeth is the effect they can have on gums and enamel. Noting that activated charcoal also does not deliver fluoride, Dr. Harms said that “there are better options out there that do work,” recommending people consult with a dentist about teeth whitening options.

        MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on teeth whitening. In addition, several whitening toothpastes and a whitening product have the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Tips Provided To Address Dry Mouth

KTVI-TV St. Louis (2/3) spoke with a local dentist about how treat dry mouth, stating that dry mouth treatment generally focuses on three areas: “managing underlying medical conditions causing the dry mouth, preventing tooth decay,” and “increasing the flow of saliva, if possible.”

Oral Health Tips Provided In Honor Of National Children’s Dental Health Month

In recognition of National Children’s Dental Health Month, several sources are continuing to discuss the importance of preventive dental care, providing tips to promote oral health.

        PRNewswire (2/3) hosted a Georgia Dental Association release stating that “during Children’s Dental Health Month in February, the Georgia Dental Association reminds parents about the importance of oral health for both children and adults alike.” President of the Georgia Dental Association, Dr. Tom Broderick, said, “Establishing a dental home and seeing your dentist twice a year, along with brushing twice a day, could help prevent many of the problems faced by people with poor dental care.”

        The Charlotte (NC) Observer (2/3) provided tips for selecting a toothbrush and toothpaste, and brushing and flossing children’s teeth. The article notes that “the American Dental Association recommends your child starts visiting the dentist within 6 months of the eruption of their first tooth.”

        The Sanford (FL) Herald (2/3) reported that “February is National Children’s Dental Health Month, an important time to promote the benefits of good oral health to children.” According to the article, the Florida Department of Health in Seminole County is encouraging “parents and caregivers to teach children proper oral care at a young age to reduce risk of getting cavities.”

        The Mountain View Telegraph (2/4) reports that the New Mexico Department of Health is also encouraging parents to help their children reduce the risk of tooth decay by developing “good oral health and eating habits.” Department of Health Cabinet Secretary Retta Ward, MPH, said, “A healthy mouth is an important part of disease prevention, not just for oral health but our overall health as well.”

Americans Limiting Sugar Intake More Than Fat, Sodium, Poll Shows

Reuters (2/2, Prentice) reports that a Reuters/Ipsos poll showed a higher percentage of Americans reported having made an effort to limit the amount of sugar they consume than those who reported limiting calories, fats, cholesterol, sodium, or total carbohydrates. According to the poll, 58 percent of people surveyed said they had limited their sugar intake in the last 30 days.

Impact of Sparkling Water On Dental Health Considered

The Atlantic (2/1, Khazan) considers the dental impact of consuming sparkling water, stating that “even when it’s unflavored, fizzy water contains an acid – carbonic acid – that gives it its bubbles.” According to the article, the acidity in sparkling water may “gradually wear away tooth enamel,” although, “unless they’re flavored with citric or other acids, seltzers tend to have more neutral pH values than soft drinks like Coke.” Damien Walmsley, a professor of dentistry at the University of Birmingham, said, “My advice is to keep acidic drinks to mealtimes, and if you have to sip drinks between meals, then plain water is the safest.”

 

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