Archive for May 2016

US Women’s Field Hockey Team Equipped With Custom-Fitted Mouthguards.

In a broader piece reporting on the US women’s field hockey team, which is preparing for the Rio Olympics, the Washington Post (5/28, Clarke) noted that the players wear “custom-fitted mouth guards that are regarded as essential in this high-velocity sport.”

        Meanwhile, WGN-TV Chicago (5/26) reported on its website that sport injuries can affect teeth, stating that mouthguards can “change the playing field, protecting the teeth and head on impact.”

        MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on mouthguards.

Smart Toothbrush Wins Intel’s Maker-Themed Reality Show.

In an article in Entrepreneur Magazine (5/25), entrepreneur and author Carol Roth states that Team Grush, creator of the Grush Brush, won “the $1 million dollar prize” on America’s Greatest Makers, Mark Burnett and Intel’s technology reality competition show. Roth, who served as one of the judges for the show, said the toothbrush aims to address the problem of dental decay by encouraging “kids to want to brush their teeth” and by providing “data to their parents and dentist so they know the kids’ brushing habits and deficiencies.”

        Engadget (5/24, Wollman) reports that Grush’s smart toothbrush is the “brainchild” of a pediatric dentist, futurist, and inventor. The toothbrush and its mobile game aim to ensure children properly brush their teeth, using built-in sensors to determine how children are holding the toothbrush and what areas of their mouth that they may be missing.

        The Chicago Tribune (5/25, Marotti) reports that “the $59 toothbrush is among several connected toothbrushes about to hit the market, including the $400 Bluetooth-enabled Prophix developed by a Wilmette dentist and the $200 Oral-B Genius from Proctor & Gamble.”

Tooth Pain May Indicate Bruxism And Should Not Be Ignored.

Woman’s Day (5/12, Brody) identified seven “seemingly trivial pains” a person “should never ignore,” including tooth pain that causes waking during the night. The article stated that experiencing tooth pain may be a sign of bruxism, which is sometimes brought on by stress. “Call your dentist so he or she can figure out the problem,” the article stated, adding that a dentist may recommend a mouth guard.

        MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on bruxism.

Archaeologists Find Evidence Ancestors Drilled Decayed Teeth.

In a 2,000-word article, BBC News (UK) (2/29, Barras) stated that human fossils show that “for millions of years of human prehistory” our ancestors generally had “good oral health – even though their dental healthcare consisted of little more than the use of simple toothpicks.” Decayed teeth “became a common problem...about 10,000 years ago” when our ancestors started farming. Soon after, “relatively sophisticated dentistry emerged.” According to the article, “In the last decade or so archaeologists have found evidence from cultures across the world that bad teeth were scraped, scoured, even drilled and filled apparently to remove decayed tissue.” In other words, it appears “the dental drill predates writing, civilisation, and even the invention of the wheel by thousands of years.”

Court Denies ABA’s Request For Injunction On San Francisco’s Sugary Drink Warnings.

The Wall Street Journal (5/17, Esterl, Subscription Publication) reports that the US District Court for the Northern District of California on Tuesday denied the American Beverage Association’s (ABA) request for a preliminary injunction against San Francisco’s law requiring health warnings on advertisements for sugary drinks.

        The AP (5/17) offers similar coverage

Bruxism May Be Contributing To Fatigue.

Fox News (5/16) carries an article from Prevention Magazine (5/3, Levine) discussing six reasons people may be tired in the morning, even after having sufficient sleep. The article includes bruxism among the six reasons listed, stating “if you wake up with a headache, it’s most likely because you’ve been clenching your jaw or grinding your teeth overnight.” Visiting a dentist to determine if a mouthguard would help is recommended.

        MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on bruxism.

Delta Dental Survey: Increasing Number Of Pregnant Women Receiving Dental Care.

In a release on PRNewswire (5/12), Delta Dental Plans Association stated that its new survey finds “the number of pregnant women going to the dentist has seen an increase of nearly seven percent over last year.” According to the 2016 Delta Dental Plans Association survey, 63 percent of mothers in the United States reported they visited the dentist during their pregnancy, up from 57.5 percent in 2015.

Skipping Dental Visits Among 50 Ways People May Be “Throwing Away Money.”

Go Banking Rates (5/10, Karimi) including skipping dental visits in a list of “50 ways you could be throwing away your money.” The article recommends scheduling dental visits and budgeting for dentist-recommended dental products, adding that “delaying your dental visits could lead to costly dental treatments in the near future.”

Former Smokers Share Stories For CDC Campaign.

CNN (5/10, Weiner, News) reports that several former smokers are sharing their stories as part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s national Tips from Former Smokers campaign. One woman shares that although she had recently quit smoking, “it was too late for her teeth.” She had “23 extracted at once.”

        MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on smoking and tobacco and provides five tips to quit.

New Study Suggests People Become More Sensitive To Pain With Age.

Psych Central (5/6, Wood) reported that a new study from University of Florida (UF) Health suggests that people become more sensitive to pain as they age. The study, published in Experimental Gerontology, “shows that inflammation occurs more quickly and at a higher magnitude — and stays around longer — when older adults experience pain.”

 

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